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Wildlife and Fireworks

Dogs aren't the only animals scared of fireworks this holiday season.

raccoon clings to wildlife works glove

According to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, "the shock of fireworks can cause wildlife to flee, ending up in unexpected areas or roadways, flying into buildings and other obstacles, and even abandoning nests, leaving young vulnerable to predators.


The shock of fireworks can cause wildlife to flee, ending up in unexpected areas or roadways, flying into buildings and other obstacles, and even abandoning nests, leaving young vulnerable to predators. The threat to wildlife doesn’t stop at startling lights and sounds; fireworks also have the potential of starting wildfires, directly affecting wildlife and destroying essential habitat. Litter from firecrackers, bottle rockets and other explosives can be choking hazards for wildlife and may be toxic if ingested."


Not only can the loud noise be startling and upsetting for wildlife, the remains of fireworks can create lasting effects, including starting wild fires that can potentially displace thousands of wildlife. Pieces of fireworks can also be ingested by animals, leak into water sources, and more.


This summer, we hope you will enjoy a firework alternative, or no fireworks at all. If you do indulge in fireworks, please be aware of your surroundings and be sure to clean up any fireworks remains.


If you find injured or orphaned wildlife, please visit carolinaconservation.org to learn more about how to best support that animal. Questions and photos can be texted to (980) 389-1133.

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